Help Your Neighbors Recover from Dorian

One month ago, Hurricane Dorian hit the Outer Banks and Ocracoke with a vengeance. It is now clear that private philanthropy will be a main lifeline for our neighbors who were devastated by this storm.

We cannot let our neighbors face this hardship alone. It’s time for us to help our neighbors.

Can you make a gift today to help our neighbors recover from this ruinous storm? Our friends have lost their furniture, their medications, their appliances, their vehicles, their homes—even their jobs.

The needs on Ocracoke are particularly severe. On Ocracoke alone, more than 2,000 homes were damaged by the storm, including 50 that were destroyed, and another 100 that sustained devastating damage. A full 40% of Ocracoke residents have been displaced by Dorian. Even worse, many folks are without income, because so many businesses were damaged and closed.

We can help our neighbors rebuild. And so many have helped already. More than 4,600 families and businesses have contributed so far. From lemonade stands to corporate donations to individual gifts, our community has been so generous—yet the needs are still more immense.

How does it work? While the Outer Banks Community Foundation is collecting the financial gifts, our nonprofit partners are on the ground, supporting storm victims, reviewing applications for assistance, and distributing funds.

Disaster Relief Funds are being used for a variety of needs. We are helping storm victims with temporary shelter, home repairs, supplies, furniture, appliances, food, and other necessities. For those who are unemployed now because of the storm, our funds will be used even more broadly—for rent, for example, groceries, medical bills, and other expenses.

In short, the Disaster Relief Fund will rebuild our Outer Banks. With your help.

It’s time for neighbors to help neighbors. If you have given already to the Disaster Relief Fund, thank you so much for your gift. But if you have not yet contributed, we urge you to donate now to help our neighbors recover from this ruinous storm.

Thank you so much for your generosity.

 

Questions? Want more info? Check out our Dorian FAQ Page.

Community Foundation Helps Nonprofits with Disaster Recovery

The Outer Banks Community Foundation has awarded over $70,000 in Rapid Response Grants to nonprofits that are leading disaster relief efforts in the face of Hurricane Dorian, and to nonprofits that were devastated by the storm.

The Community Foundation has been busily raising money to help families and individuals from Ocracoke and Dare County recover from the storm. However, the funding for the Rapid Response Grants is from the Community Foundation’s own endowment, and is in addition to—and separate from—the new money raised for Ocracoke and Hatteras residents.

“Our primary focus has been raising funds to assist residents that were incapacitated by Dorian,” said Lorelei Costa, Executive Director of the Community Foundation, “but with the Rapid Response Grants, we are also recognizing that many of our local nonprofits were just as hard hit.”

“As soon as the storm winds died, nonprofits and volunteers were on the ground, in the receding waters, assisting storm victims—feeding people, mucking houses, clearing debris, providing supplies,” said Ms. Costa. “Some of our nonprofits did this with no funding, or they depleted their hard-won reserves, in order to provide emergency services to their neighbors.”

Among the recipients of the Rapid Response Grants were Hatteras Island Community Emergency Response Team, Ocracoke Fire Prevention Association, Interfaith Community Outreach, and Cape Hatteras United Methodist Men. All four nonprofits received grants for supplies, equipment, and tools to aid in their disaster recovery efforts.

The Beach Food Pantry, which has been supplying fresh fruits and vegetables to Ocracoke, received support, along with Hatteras Island Meals, the Food Bank of the Albemarle, and the Elizabeth City Corps of the Salvation Army, which has been providing hot meals to storm victims and first responders.

Other local nonprofits lost key infrastructure to the storm, or sustained overwhelming damage to their facilities. In Ocracoke, the community fish house, owned and operated by the nonprofit Ocracoke Working Watermen’s Association, was flooded and its ice house and retail space destroyed. OWWA received an $8,000 Rapid Response Grant to repair its ice house in time for the fall southern flounder fishery, which is economically important to local fishermen.

“The Ocracoke Food Pantry, the Ocracoke Community Park, Deepwater Theater, the Ocracoke Library—all operated by nonprofits, all sustained debilitating storm damage,” said Ms. Costa. “These organizations all received Rapid Response Grants to repair facilities and/or replace damaged equipment.”

Even on Roanoke Island, the Elizabethan Gardens lost a greenhouse, fencing, electrical systems, and numerous trees and plantings. An anonymous donor-advised fund at the Community Foundation will be assisting the Gardens with their rebuild.

The Rapid Response Grants were supported by the Community Foundation’s largest and broadest grant-making pool, the Community Fund, as well as numerous donor-advised and designated funds at the Community Foundation, including the Cathi Ostrander Family Fund, the Charles H. & Dorothy S. Luedemann Arts Fund, the Hatteras Fund, the Kelly Family Fund, the Preston Family Fund, the Shirley & David Doran Memorial Fund, the Simpson Sharp Oakes Fund, and the Spencer Family Fund.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation continues to collect financial contributions to assist individuals and families in Dare County and Ocracoke who have been devastated by Hurricane Dorian. All contributions are tax-deductible, and every penny of every gift will be used to directly assist local individuals and families. Donations can be made securely online at www.obxdisaster.org.

OBCF Disaster Fund Receives $50,000 from BB&T Charitable Fund

The Outer Banks Community Foundation’s Disaster Relief Fund has received a $50,000 grant from the BB&T Charitable Fund to help support hundreds of affected families across Dare County and Ocracoke following Hurricane Dorian.

“BB&T’s mission for our bank has always been to make our world a better place to live, and we are so honored to have this opportunity to help the members of our community and to provide support to the families in need,” said Annalisa Morgan, Albemarle Area Market President of BB&T.

BB&T’s leadership gift to the Disaster Relief Fund will make a direct impact on the victims of Hurricane Dorian in both Ocracoke and Dare County. The Disaster Relief Fund will help individuals and families with both immediate necessities—including supplies, appliances, temporary shelter—and also long-term recovery, including home repairs.

As the official collection agency for monetary donations post-Dorian, the Community Foundation is soliciting and processing all financial contributions, and then funneling every dollar to the nonprofits on the ground to aid disaster victims. The agencies distributing funds to victims include the Ocracoke Fire Protection Association, Cape Hatteras United Methodist Men, and Interfaith Community Outreach.

The groups work directly with disaster victims to first help them apply for any applicable sources of support, such as insurance and FEMA (if available). Then the Disaster Relief Fund, including the BB&T donation, will serve as “last dollars in” to meet any unmet needs, ensuring that philanthropic dollars go as far as possible.

The Disaster Relief Fund has grown to over $875,000 with contributions from more than 4,200 families from across the Outer Banks—and from across the United States and the world.

Yet, says Lorelei Costa, Executive Director of the Community Foundation, even this large amount is merely a “drop in the bucket” compared to community need, especially on Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands.

“So many of our neighbors have lost everything in this storm,” said Ms. Costa. “They lost not only their belongings, their medications, their cars, their homes; many have lost their jobs and source of income for months to come, as local businesses rebuild and recover from epic flood levels. The Disaster Relief Fund is in it for the long haul and will help local residents with all of these needs.”

“We are so very grateful to BB&T for this leadership gift,” said Greg Honeycutt, Ocracoke resident and board member of the Community Foundation. “They are truly setting the example for our business community. I hope more businesses will continue to pitch in.”

Ms. Costa emphasized that every penny donated to the Disaster Relief Fund will go to local individuals and families in need. Neither the Community Foundation, nor any of its nonprofit partners, are using disaster relief donations for fees, salaries, or administrative or operating expenses.

The Community Foundation is gratefully accepting donations to the Disaster Relief Fund for Dare and Ocracoke. Please go to www.obxdisaster.org to make a secure donation online, or mail your check to OBCF, 13 Skyline Road, Southern Shores, NC 27949, with “disaster relief” written in the memo line. Or call 252-261-8839 for more information on how to give.

OBCF Announces Rapid-Response Grants Cycle for Nonprofits after Dorian

The Outer Banks Community Foundation has announced an emergency, rapid-response grants cycle to support nonprofit organizations after Hurricane Dorian. Applications are due by Friday, September 20. To apply, call Lorelei Costa at 252-455-1404.

 

Grant Purpose

First Priority: The primary goal of these grants is to enable nonprofits to provide immediate disaster relief and short-term recovery support to residents of Dare County and Ocracoke.

Second Priority: If funds are available, grants will be considered to help nonprofits in Dare County or Ocracoke repair or replace any facilities, equipment, buildings, or other assets that were lost or damaged due to Hurricane Dorian, if the nonprofit demonstrates that funds are needed immediately.

 

Eligible Organizations

Nonprofit organizations serving Ocracoke and/or Dare County with 501(c)3 public charity status may apply—including those organizations that already have an active grant with the Community Foundation. Local organizations may be given priority for funding.

Schools, government agencies, and individuals are not eligible to apply.

Churches and faith-based organizations are eligible to apply if they are assisting the wider community (i.e., not just members of their own faith or congregation), and if their outreach does not include the promotion of religious beliefs. Grantees must provide services on a nondiscriminatory basis.

 

Eligible Projects and Grant Expenses

First Priority: Hurricane Dorian Relief Grants are intended to help nonprofits provide immediate and short-term assistance to residents of Dare County and Ocracoke who have been affected by Hurricane Dorian. Grants can pay for food, supplies, equipment, educational materials, and other tangible goods and direct expenses. Operating, overhead, and indirect costs are not eligible for grant funding.

Special emphasis may be given to efforts that help the most vulnerable and/or the most people.

Contract help and/or additional program staff may also be eligible if used for extra personnel that was hired or augmented to meet the need after Dorian. Grants are to be used for program staff only; neither administrative nor management staff time is eligible.

Rapid response grants are not intended to be used by a nonprofit to provide direct financial assistance to hurricane victims. Financial assistance to individuals should be covered through the Community Foundation’s Disaster Relief Funds, in cooperation with our existing nonprofit partners. Please call our staff if you have questions about these parameters.

Second Priority: If funds are available, grants may be considered to help nonprofits in repairing or replacing any facilities, equipment, buildings, or other assets in Dare County or Ocracoke that were lost or damaged due to Hurricane Dorian. This includes all nonprofits in the affected area, not just relief-related nonprofits. For eligibility within this rapid-response grant cycle, a nonprofit should demonstrate that funds are needed immediately. For non-immediate needs, nonprofits may be encouraged to apply in 2020 when additional funds are available.

Repair of public infrastructure or facilities is not eligible for funding (e.g., road or school repair).

All grants will be paid on a reimbursement basis. Grant expenses must be substantiated by third-party documentation (e.g., receipts, statements, and invoices). These documents should be generated from your vendor, not from your organization, with the exception of documentation of staff time. Grants for staff time will be paid upon the furnishing of timesheets; please ask our staff for sample timesheets or if you have questions.

Any expenses incurred during, after, and even immediately before Dorian are eligible within this grant program.

 

How To Apply

Before applying, please call or email Lorelei Costa (252-455-1404 or LCosta@obcf.org) to discuss your nonprofit’s needs.

Applications should consist of a one- or two-page letter, briefly describing the mission of your nonprofit, your project, the need you are meeting, and who will benefit from your services. Please be as specific as possible in terms of the number and demographics of the people you serve.

Attached to your letter, please include a project budget and, if you’ve never received a grant from the Community Foundation, your 501(c)3  letter.

Email your letter on or before Friday, September 20 to LCosta@obcf.org.

Grants will be announced on Friday, September 27.

TowneBank Leads With Disaster Relief Donation

With a $150,000 contribution to the Outer Banks Community Foundation’s Disaster Relief Fund, TowneBank has committed to helping Ocracoke and Hatteras Island rebuild after Hurricane Dorian.

“Our hearts go out to the Ocracoke and Hatteras communities as they rebuild their homes and businesses,” said Taylor Sugg, president of TowneBank Northeastern North Carolina.

“This is the first step in what will be a long and challenging recovery process that TowneBank and the community are committed to supporting. Through the partnership with the Community Foundation, we are able to support our hometown. Working together we will rebuild our wonderful Outer Banks community,” he said.

TowneBank’s exceptional gift to the Disaster Relief Fund sets the bar high, and the bar is being raised even higher as individual donations have poured in. The Relief Fund has grown to over $400,000 with contributions from more than 1,600 families from across the Outer Banks—and from across the United States.

“It’s incredibly humbling to see this outpouring of support, not only from the Outer Banks community, but from people across the country who love the Outer Banks,” said Lorelei Costa, Executive Director of the Community Foundation. “Every single penny donated will go to local individuals and families in need.”

The road to recovery is going be a long one. The eye of the storm passed over Buxton, and the damage to Avon, Hatteras Village, and Buxton is still being evaluated.

“We’re still in the very early stages of assessing the needs,” said Leigh Brindley, Long-Term Recovery Coordinator for Dare County. “My social workers have already identified 100 families who are going to need some level of help, and there’s going to be more.”

The worst of Dorian’s destructive power, though, was reserved for Ocracoke, where the storm surge reached unprecedented levels.

“The worst flooding that most of us could remember was in Matthew, and this was two or three feet worse than that,” said Earl Pugh, Chair of the Hyde County Board of Commissioners. “A lot of the older homes that were built right on the ground, they had two, three feet of water in them. Most all of the businesses, even out on Highway 12, had water in them. That north wind just piled the water up.”

Bob Woodard, Chair of the Dare County Board of Commissioners, added: “Having a direct hit on Hatteras Island and Ocracoke, it was devastating. There’s a lot of folks there with damage from flooding and wind.”

“The funding and generous donations, they are giving a glimmer of hope,” Commissioner Pugh said.

For State Representative Bobby Hanig, the generosity of the community is part of what sets the Outer Banks apart as a place to live, work, and visit.

“What amazes me: when things happen on the Outer Banks, no one pulls together like we do. We take no time whatsoever to pitch in and help someone out. The outpouring of relief and the folks who want to come out and help is just remarkable,” he said.

In Ocracoke, no one is quite sure when the roads will be repaired and power fully restored. Hyde County Commissioner Tom Pahl talked about what the donations mean to the people of his village.

“I can’t tell you how incredibly grateful we are for the donation that TowneBank has made, and for everyone’s donations, whether it’s a contribution like TowneBank’s, or even just $5 or $10. Our gratitude is boundless,” he said. “There is also a very heartfelt thanks to the Outer Banks Community Foundation for all that they have done.”

The Community Foundation is gratefully accepting donations to the Disaster Relief Fund for Dare and Ocracoke. Please go to www.obxdisaster.org to make a secure donation online, or mail your check to OBCF, 13 Skyline Road, Southern Shores, NC 27949, with “disaster relief” written in the memo line. Or call 252-261-8839 for more information on how to give.

 

Photograph by Shane Moore, Twiddy & Company. From left to right: Lorelei Costa, Executive Director of the Outer Banks Community Foundation; State Representative Bobby Hanig; Earl Pugh, Chairman of the Hyde County Board of Commissioners; Taylor Sugg, President of TowneBank Northeastern North Carolina; Bob Woodard, Chairman of the Dare County Board of Commissioners; Scott Brown, President of the Outer Banks Community Foundation; Rufus Pritchard, Chairman of the TowneBank Dare County Board of Directors; Jane Webster, Vice-President of the Outer Banks Community Foundation.

Donate Today to Help Dorian Victims Across OBX

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is now gratefully accepting donations to support relief and recovery after Hurricane Dorian in both Dare County and Ocracoke.

All contributions are tax-deductible, and every penny of every gift will be used to directly assist local individuals and families.

Donations can be made securely online by clicking here, or can be mailed to the Outer Banks Community Foundation at 13 Skyline Road, Southern Shores, NC 27949. Please write “Disaster Relief” in the memo line of your check, and specify whether your gift should be designated for Dare County, Ocracoke, or both. (Disaster gifts without a specified geography will be split 50/50 toward both communities.)

Questions? Check out our Dorian FAQ Page, or contact us for more information.

 

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is a public charity that helps meet local needs across Dare County and the entire Outer Banks. The Community Foundations manages 175 charitable funds for individuals and agencies, awards charitable grants to local nonprofits, administers 50 scholarship programs, and provides tailored services to help donors pursue their charitable interests. Since its inception in 1982, the Community Foundation has awarded more than $9 million in grants and scholarships to local nonprofits and students.

The Community Foundation is Hiring!

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is now accepting applications for a new, full-time position on our staff: Development and Communications Manager.

This permanent, full-time employee will help grow our foundation by supporting the development of new gifts and funds to our endowment. S/he will play a lead role in communicating our vision, services, and impact to existing and prospective donors, and in managing and creating all of our organization’s publications, with a special focus on donor audiences. This staffer will also help support our fundraising efforts in a facilitating role.

This is a new position within our organization! We are looking for applicants with exceptional writing skills, a high degree of professionalism, and sharp attention to detail. The ideal candidate is resourceful, creative, committed to excellence, and happy to self-teach on the job. Most of all, we’re looking for someone who is passionate about making a positive difference for the Outer Banks, someone who can communicate that passion, both verbally and in written format, someone who wants to empower others to contribute to good causes in our community.

Click here for the full position description. To apply, please email your résumé, cover letter, and at least one writing sample, all in PDF format, to LCosta@obcf.org. Applications received by August 31 will receive priority consideration. Please specify “Development and Communications Manager” in the subject line of your email. Your writing sample should be wholly written and edited by yourself. For more information, visit our website at www.obcf.org. Please, no phone calls.

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The Outer Banks Community Foundation is an equal opportunity employer. It is our policy to make all hiring and other employment decisions without regard to an individual’s sex, race, national origin, religion, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, or physical or mental disability.

Costa Joins Board of NC Network of Grantmakers

The Executive Director of the Outer Banks Community Foundation has been elected to serve on the Board of the NC Network of Grantmakers.

Lorelei Costa, who has led the Community Foundation since 2012, will serve on the Network Board of Directors with 13 other philanthropic leaders from across North Carolina, representing a range of private, family, corporate, and community foundations.

“I am excited to join such a prestigious group,” said Costa. “This is an opportunity for our Community Foundation to learn from the most influential and impactful foundations working in our state. It’s my honor to ensure that a voice from Dare County and Northeastern North Carolina is heard in statewide philanthropic venues.”

Costa has 20 years’ experience in the charitable and philanthropic sectors, working and volunteering for such groups as the NC Coastal Land Trust, the Alaska Chamber Singers, the Alaska Women’s Giving Circle, the Triangle Land Conservancy, and the Southern Shores Volunteer Fire Department. She has a BA from UNC Chapel Hill and a certificate in nonprofit management from Duke University.

 

The NC Network of Grantmakers connects more than 115 foundations and corporate giving programs to a network of knowledge, resources, and sector colleagues that help them meet their mission and serve the community. The Network provides grantmakers the ability to come together, learn together, build relationships, and create a body of knowledge that enables them to conduct their work more effectively.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is a public charity that connects people who care with causes that matter. The Community Foundation manages $18 million in 180 charitable funds for individuals and agencies, awards charitable grants to local nonprofits, administers 50 scholarship programs, and provides tailored services to help donors pursue their charitable interests. Since its inception in 1982, the Community Foundation has awarded more than $9 million in grants and scholarships to local nonprofits and students.

A Hard Worker with a Helping Hand: Introducing the Shearouse Scholarship

Story by Arabella Saunders

Master Chief of the U.S. Naval Submarine Service. Recipient of the Navy Achievement Medal. Head of the Dare County Fleet Maintenance Department. Boss of his own yard maintenance company. These are just a few of the titles Howell Revier Shearouse, Jr. held in his lifetime.

Put plain and simple: the man was a hard worker.

Born in 1939 in Savannah, Georgia, Shearouse graduated from Martha Berry High School in Rome, Georgia before enlisting in the Naval Submarine Service.

Joining the military was more than a career choice for Shearouse — it was a necessity.

“He lost his father at a young age and joined the Navy to help save the family farm,” Shearouse’s son Chip said. “He was sending money back to the farm to help take care of his mom and sisters.”

In addition to earning money, the Navy gave Shearouse something he would hold cherish for the rest of his life: an education.

“He got his degree on the submarines,” Chip said. “They had professors that traveled with them and taught them their classes. Education was just a really big deal to my dad. He said it was ‘something they couldn’t take away from him.’ ”

Throughout his time in the military, Shearouse lived in a handful of towns up and down the East Coast before settling in Kill Devil Hills in the mid-1980s. Once here, he worked for the Dare County Fleet Maintenance Department and started his own yard maintenance company.

“Even when he wasn’t working, my dad was always piddling with something,” Chip said. “When anybody’s vehicle broke or anything broke, he was the first person called. He would drop everything to go help anyone, my friends, his friends, anyone.”

When he wasn’t working or helping someone out, Shearouse enjoyed a variety of activities — sailing, gardening, playing music with friends, riding his motorcycle, and more. Chip said that although his mother convinced his father to move to the beach in the 80s, “it was the people and the water that kept him here.”

And just before his death in February 2016, Shearouse looked to the Outer Banks Community Foundation to establish a scholarship that would help the very community he had grown to love over the years.

In May 2019, the Howell Revier Shearouse, Jr. Scholarship was awarded for the first time to First Flight High School senior Hannah Ellington. To qualify for the $20,000 four-year scholarship, applicants had to demonstrate financial need, plan to attend a public college, university, or technical school in North Carolina, maintain a minimum 2.63 GPA, and either participate in volunteer work or hold a part-time job.

“Work was very, very important to my dad. He wouldn’t want anyone who was lazy to get the scholarship,” Chip said with a laugh. “He always made sure if I wanted something, I was working for it. He was good to all of us, but if we didn’t at least try, there was no helping us.”

Luckily, Ellington is no stranger to hard work.

The straight-A student graduated high school with a 4.38 GPA, all while balancing advanced classes, multiple extracurricular activities, and a part-time job as a hostess at Kill Devil Grill.

“Balancing all of my extracurriculars was a struggle at some points, but coming out on the other side and looking back on all that I have achieved, all the late nights, stress, and tears were worth it,” Ellington said.

One of her many extracurriculars was serving as the co-editor-in-chief of Nighthawk News Magazine, First Flight High School’s award-winning, student-run news magazine. In February, she was named an alternate for the 2019 Rachel Rivers-Coffey North Carolina High School Journalist of the Year, an awarded that included a $1,000 scholarship.

Ellington will attend North Carolina State University this fall and plans to major in zoology and minor in journalism. She will also be working throughout school, one of the requirements for the Shearouse scholarship.

“My dad would be really pleased that Hannah received his scholarship: there’s absolutely no doubt in my mind,” Chip said. “She’s awesome, and he’d be more than happy that she got it.”

 

Anyone who wishes to honor Howell Revier Shearouse, Jr. is invited to contribute to the Shearouse Scholarship Fund. Your gift to this permanent endowment will help hard-working students for generations to come. Go to www.obcf.org/donate, select “Other Fund,” and choose “Howell Revier Shearouse, Jr. Scholarship Fund” from the list of funds that appears. For more information on starting a scholarship of your own, click here.

Community Foundation Awards More Than $36,000 in Grants

From finding forever homes for senior pets to restoring history, thanks to the generosity of Outer Banks Community Foundation donors, a variety of local nonprofits are now prepared to augment their impact on the community. 

When Community Foundation board members met in early June, they awarded nearly $37,000 in Community Enrichment and Special Focus grants​ that will help hundreds across the Outer Banks. 

The Ocracoke Foundation earned a Community Enrichment Grant of $15,000 to restore the Will Willis Store & Fish House. Built in 1930, the fish house is the “last surviving example of NC maritime heritage,” according to Reid Thomas of the State Historic Preservation Office. The grant will fund exhibits in the newly restored building to showcase educational materials, artifacts, and archives.  

The Outer Banks Forum for the Lively Arts also earned a Community Enrichment Grant of $1,000 to provide Dare County students with a variety of cultural arts programs. 

The Coastal Humane Society earned a $910 Special Focus Grant that will provide 14 Dare County Volunteer Fire Departments with leading-edge equipment to resuscitate dogs and cats trapped in fires. Feline Hope and Hatteras Island Wildlife Rehabilitation each earned $1,000 grants to help with shelter repairs and to assist with owl rehabilitation, respectively. 

The Monarch Beach Club of Dare, an organization for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, earned a Special Focus Grant of $3,500 that will help provide the club with light-weight, moveable tables, chairs, and storage when it moves to a new location in 2020. The Monarch Lighthouse Club earned a $5,000 grant from the Community Foundation that will assist with the cost of transportation services to and from the program site each day for club participants in Currituck County.

Currituck County Schools earned a $5,000 Special Focus Grant to provide Exceptional Children’s staff with research-based training to uplift children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Dare County Schools also earned a $3,283 Special Focus Grant to provide communication systems like iPads and head mounts for students with cognitive disabilities. 

OBX ARF earned a $500 Special Focus Grant to help with their Silver Paws program, a project that pairs humans over the age of 50 with pets over the age of 5 years. The First Flight Society also earned a $500 grant to commission professional re-enactors portraying Orville and Wilbur Wright to visit Dare County Schools, in conjunction with the fourth grade study of NC history.

Several donor-advised funds also made grants in June, including the Just for Today and Tomorrow Fund, in memory of Dorman N. Doutt and Florence B. Satterwhite. Donor-advised funds are managed on behalf of individuals and families, who recommend the grants that are awarded. This month’s recipients included a host of organizations, including Elizabethan Gardens, the Salvation Army, the College of the Albemarle, the NC Lions VIP Fishing Tournament, and the Blue Star Mothers. 

The Community Foundation is now accepting applications for its next cycle of Community Enrichment Grants. Eligible projects must directly benefit all or a portion of the Community Foundation’s service area, which includes all of Dare County, and all Outer Banks communities, from Corolla to Ocracoke Island. Community Enrichment Grants support all charitable causes, including arts and culture, children/youth, disaster relief and prevention, education, the environment, historic interpretation and preservation, and other human services.

Prospective applicants are urged to review the grant guidelines online at www.obcf.org/grants, and then call the Community Foundation to discuss their ideas. The application deadline is Friday, July 26, 2019.