Billy G. Roughton Scholarships To Help Students Achieve Their Dreams

At six foot and one inches, Billy Roughton was a big man, and he had nicknames to match. His many friends called him ‘Bear,’ from high school onward, his grandkids called him ‘Big Daddy,’ and he was just ‘Billy’ to his wife of 50 ½ years, Millie. Billy’s story is one of mentorship, marriage, undying devotion, hard work, random acts of kindness, and paying it forward. Millie Roughton recently chose to honor her magnanimous husband by establishing two scholarships at the Outer Banks Community Foundation in his name.

Billy and Millie met in Elizabeth City when they were just 18 and 20 years old. Billy was a store clerk at Overman & Stevenson Pharmacy on Main; Millie was a hairstylist at a salon across the street. Millie recalled, “We started dating in the fall, and we were married that January. We just knew.”

Billy soon turned his attention to a career and decided to earn a degree in Pharmacology. He worked at the pharmacy by day and did his schoolwork at night, beginning at College of the Albemarle and ultimately earning his PhD at UNC-Chapel Hill. They started a family; Billy built Millie a hair salon on the side of their home, just off the living room, so she could work and watch their young daughters. “We both worked really hard,” she recalled with a smile.

They shared a lifelong love of the Outer Banks, came down to the beach every summer, and soon purchased rental property. They made a permanent move in the 70s with the purchase and relocation of Jacock’s, an Elizabeth City pharmacy. “We moved it to Kitty Hawk and renamed it ‘Bear Drugs,’” said Millie. “Our daughter Amy was obsessed with bears; she picked out the name.”

In addition to owning and running a pharmacy, Billy’s interests included commercial development, real estate, and restaurants. “We started Prime Only in Nags Head – the steaks were the best,” remembered Millie. “I miss them!”

Billy served on several boards around town, including the Dare County Health Department. One of many gifts made in his lifetime, Billy donated the property where the Monument to a Century of Flight stands today. He also mentored other pharmacists throughout his career, endeavoring to instill in them his penchant for accuracy and quality when mixing and compounding prescriptions. Always a strong believer in education, Billy anonymously provided financial support to a number of college students throughout his career.

Their daughters, Pam, Amy, and Jennifer, naturally picked up a strong work ethic and love for learning from their parents. Pam attended the NC School of Science & Mathematics in Durham while in high school, and then went on to UNC to earn her degree. Amy attended College of the Albemarle and UNC-W, and ultimately went back for a second career, as an older student. She earned degrees in both Arts and Nursing, and today is an RN at the Outer Banks Hospital.

“Our youngest, Jennifer, attend College of the Albemarle, and has made a career in the hospitality business,” said Millie. “She has loved hospitality since she was a high schooler, working at our restaurants.”

Billy died suddenly in 2015, at age 70. Stunned by her family’s loss, Millie knew she had to memorialize the wonderful man who had been her partner in life.

And now she has done just that. Earlier this year Millie founded two scholarships in honor of her husband with the Outer Banks Community Foundation. The Billy G. Roughton Memorial Scholarship for Medical Professions will provide financial assistance to students to pursue studies related to medical professions; The Billy G. Roughton Memorial Scholarship for Tourism and Hospitality will help students interested in tourism and/or hospitality. Both look for learners from Dare or Currituck County who have a strong academic record. Two scholarships will be awarded each year, one from each fund. “The funds can be awarded to students right out of high school, or to students returning to school later in life,” Millie said.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation manages scholarship funds not only for families, but also for churches, civic groups, nonprofits, and businesses, including the Outer Banks Association of Realtors, Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church, the Duck Woods Ladies Tennis and Golf Associations, and all four of Dare County’s local rotary groups, among others. Both of the Roughton scholarships will be managed in partnership with the College of the Albemarle, focusing on students who are ineligible for other scholarship support.

Anyone can memorialize Billy Roughton with a gift to the new scholarship funds in his name, or can create a new scholarship with another purpose. The Community Foundation has awarded more than $1,300,000 in scholarships to over 1,200 Outer Banks students since the organization’s inception in 1983. For more information, call Lorelei Costa at 252-261-8839, or visit www.obcf.org.

“Billy never wanted recognition; he didn’t want his name on anything,” recalled Millie. “This is my way of honoring his life and all that he meant to me, to his family, and to the community. He would enjoy knowing he is helping deserving students attend higher education.”

Wells Fargo Bank Awards $50,000 Grant for Disaster Relief

Wells Fargo has awarded a $50,000 grant to the Outer Banks Community Foundation for the Ocracoke Disaster Relief Fund. The grant will directly support hundreds of households who have been devastated by Hurricane Dorian.

“Our hearts go out to all the families and businesses impacted by Hurricane Dorian,” said Thomas Cline, Wells Fargo’s Region Bank president for Eastern North Carolina. “Wells Fargo is committed to supporting our communities in their time of need, and we appreciate the Community Foundation’s commitment to ensuring that every penny in the Disaster Relief Fund will go directly to hurricane victims.”

“Our neighbors on Ocracoke are still struggling terribly in the aftermath of this hurricane,” said Lorelei Costa, Executive Director of the Community Foundation. “Private philanthropy is now playing the leading role in rebuilding our communities, and Wells Fargo’s donation is a big step forward in meeting our neighbors’ needs.”

Already, dozens of  households on Ocracoke have been awarded assistance through the Disaster Relief Fund. Administered in partnership with the Ocracoke Fire Department, the Fund is helping these families with appliances, car down payments, utilities, rent payments, wheelchair ramps, medications and medical equipment, electrical repairs, and much more.

The Disaster Relief Fund has also pledged up to $500,000 toward temporary shelter and home repair needs. In partnership with Hyde County, the Fund is paying for utility hook-ups for 35 temporary trailers for Ocracoke families while their homes are rebuilt or repaired. Additionally, the Disaster Relief Fund has pledged financial assistance to purchase building supplies for home repairs for 60 Ocracoke homes, in partnership the United Methodist Committee on Relief.

These awards, said Ms. Costa, are just the beginning of many grants to come over the next many months.

Relief efforts on Ocracoke are led by volunteers, who are contributing countless unpaid hours to helping their neighbors in the recovery. This includes volunteer case workers, who are working directly with storm victims, and the members of the Ocracoke Fire Department, who are managing disbursements. Beyond Ocracoke, more than 7,700 businesses and families have donated to the Disaster Relief Fund since Hurricane Dorian.

“We have been astounded by the efforts of the volunteers in Ocracoke, who are tirelessly helping their neighbors, and the generosity of people across the country who have donated to Disaster Relief,” said Ms. Costa. “From large institutions like Wells Fargo, to children running lemonade stands, the outpouring of generosity has been incredibly humbling.”

The Community Foundation is still accepting donations to the Disaster Relief Fund for Ocracoke. Contributors can visit www.obxdisaster.org to make a secure donation online. Or mail a check to OBCF, 13 Skyline Road, Southern Shores, NC 27949, with “Ocracoke disaster relief” written in the memo line.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is a public charity that helps meet local needs across Dare County and the entire Outer Banks. The Community Foundations manages $19 million in 175 charitable funds for individuals and agencies, awards charitable grants to local nonprofits, administers 50 scholarship programs, and provides tailored services to help donors pursue their charitable interests. Since its inception in 1982, the Community Foundation has awarded more than $9 million in grants and scholarships to local nonprofits and students.

Disaster Funds Allocated for Home Rebuilds, Repairs, and Temp Housing

More than $625,000 has now been allocated and awarded from the Outer Banks Community Foundation’s Ocracoke Disaster Relief Fund for Dorian victims. As recovery efforts continue on the island, much more financial assistance is to come, according to Fund representatives.

The Ocracoke Disaster Relief Fund was raised by the Community Foundation from thousands of generous donors across the country, and the dollars are being awarded and disbursed by a committee of local volunteers from the Ocracoke Fire Protection Association.

More than half a million dollars has now been dedicated by the Ocracoke Recovery Fund Committee for housing for Ocracoke storm victims. This includes $300,000 that has been pledged for materials and supplies for repair and rebuilding projects. In partnership with the United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR), Community Foundation money will be used for building supplies and materials for storm victims, including sheet rock, lumber, shingles, and more, with priority focus on helping the elderly and people with medical needs.

“We’re delighted to partner with UMCOR on this rebuilding project, which will benefit at least 60 Ocracoke families,” said Lorelei Costa, the Community Foundation’s Executive Director. “UMCOR will be leveraging a national pool of volunteers, who will travel to Ocracoke to help families repair and rebuild their homes. With our funds, UMCOR will be able to purchase deeply discounted building materials in bulk, allowing us to help even more families.”

Additionally, the Ocracoke Recovery Fund Committee has set aside another $200,000 to install temporary housing trailers purchased by Hyde County. At least 35 families will be able to live in these trailers while their homes are being repaired or rebuilt. The Ocracoke Disaster Relief Fund will subsidize utility hook-ups, like septic, water, gas, and power.

In addition, the Ocracoke Recovery Fund Committee continues to approve monetary assistance to additional storm victims each week to help them pay bills. Funds have been awarded for roof repairs, appliances, furniture, vehicle replacement, utilities, rental assistance, wheelchair ramps, medications, medical equipment, insulation, electrical repairs, and much more.

Additionally, the Ocracoke Recovery Fund Committee recently awarded funds for sixty space heaters, which are being distributed to families in time for the approaching winter.

If you or your family suffered hardship or damage from Hurricane Dorian, and you’re a full-time resident of Ocracoke or Dare County, you can still request assistance from the Ocracoke Disaster Relief Fund. Full-time Ocracoke residents are invited to contact the Ocracoke Recovery Fund Committee by emailing ocracokerecoveryfund@gmail.com. Full-time residents of Dare County can contact Interfaith Community Outreach through 252-480-0070.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation continues to collect financial contributions to assist individuals and families in Dare County and Ocracoke who have been devastated by Hurricane Dorian. All contributions to the Community Foundation Disaster Relief Fund are tax-deductible, and every penny of every gift will be used to directly assist local individuals and families – neither the Community Foundation, nor any of its nonprofit partners, are using disaster relief donations for fees, salaries, or administrative or operating expenses. Donations can be made securely online at www.obxdisaster.org.

Destination Dare Video Features Community Foundation

Community Foundation Executive Director Lorelei Costa is interviewed for the November 2019 edition of CURRENT TV’s Destination Dare. Thanks to the Town of Southern Shores for highlighting the Outer Banks Community Foundation. To see the video, click here.

OBCF and Firehouse Supports 65 Ocracoke Households – Many More To Come

This week, more than 65 households on Ocracoke have been awarded assistance for Dorian recovery from money raised by the Outer Banks Community Foundation. As relief efforts continue on the island, much more financial assistance is to come, according to Community Foundation representatives.

The Ocracoke Firehouse Committee, which is the group of volunteers disbursing the Community Foundation’s Disaster Relief Fund, reviewed dozens of applications over the weekend, and awarded monies to over 65 families. Funds have been awarded for roof repairs, appliances, furniture, car down payments, utilities, rental assistance, wheelchair ramps, medications and medical equipment, insulation, pilings, electrical repairs, and much more.

“We are so excited to get these disaster relief dollars to Ocracokers to make life easier for our neighbors,” said Lorelei Costa, Community Foundation Executive Director. “Islanders still grapple daily with significant challenges, and this is just the beginning of many grants to come over the next many months. It’s our highest priority to assist local households with financial need as expeditiously and as prudently as possible.”

The Firehouse Committee has also approved funding to assist with temporary shelter for displaced residents. In partnership with Hyde County, which is purchasing 35 temporary trailers for local families while their homes are rebuilt or repaired, the Firehouse Committee has committed funding to connect these trailers with power, water, septic, and gas.

“We are incredibly grateful to our partners with the Ocracoke Fire Department, and the volunteer case managers with the Ocracoke Interfaith Relief and Recovery Team,” said Ms. Costa. “These dedicated folks are working tirelessly to assist disaster victims, ascertain their needs, and diligently steward our donated dollars to help as many people as possible.”

In Dare County, including on Hatteras Island, the Disaster Relief Fund has also helped many families with home repairs, roof replacements, temporary shelter, and much more.

To request assistance from the Firehouse Committee and the Outer Banks Community Foundation, full-time residents are urged to submit an initial application through the Ocracoke Recovery Center, which remains in the Variety Store parking lot through November 7. Applications received through the Recovery Center will be reviewed by the Firehouse Committee with names of applicants withheld.

After November 7, residents are invited to contact the Firehouse Committee for assistance by emailing ocracokerecoveryfund@gmail.com.

OBCF Disaster Relief Funds Support Ocracoke Individuals

Disaster Relief Fund donations to the Outer Banks Community Foundation are now being awarded to individuals in need on Ocracoke and across Dare County. Islanders still grapple daily with significant challenges but are slowly getting back on their feet from Hurricane Dorian, which left widespread devastation when it made landfall on September 6.

On Ocracoke, two rounds of distributions to individuals have been approved since October 10, and much more help is on the way. Recent disbursements to Ocracoke include a wheelchair ramp at one home, a lift chair for a person needing special assistance at another, travel expenses for an evacuation due to a medical condition caused by mold, a walker for an elderly person, and an oxygen machine with battery backup for another individual in dire need.

“We are so excited to get these disaster relief dollars out into the Ocracoke community to make life easier for our neighbors, and it’ll be the first of many grants to come over the next many months,” said Lorelei Costa, Community Foundation Executive Director.

“Ocracokers have had real struggles with the most basic of needs. Going to school, preparing a healthy meal, getting to a bank or a doctor—these are things many of us take for granted, but not those on Ocracoke. We are so grateful to our partners with the Ocracoke Fire Department and the Ocracoke Interfaith Relief and Recovery Team for working with disaster victims, assessing applications for assistance, and managing these funds so diligently.”

In Dare County, including on Hatteras Island, the Disaster Relief Fund has already helped many families with home repairs, roof replacements, temporary shelter, and much more.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation continues to collect financial contributions to assist individuals and families in Dare County and Ocracoke who have been devastated by Hurricane Dorian. All contributions to the Community Foundation Disaster Relief Fund are tax-deductible, and every penny of every gift will be used to directly assist local individuals and families – neither the Community Foundation, nor any of its nonprofit partners, are using disaster relief donations for fees, salaries, or administrative or operating expenses. Donations can be made securely online at www.obxdisaster.org.

Help Your Neighbors Recover from Dorian

One month ago, Hurricane Dorian hit the Outer Banks and Ocracoke with a vengeance. It is now clear that private philanthropy will be a main lifeline for our neighbors who were devastated by this storm.

We cannot let our neighbors face this hardship alone. It’s time for us to help our neighbors.

Can you make a gift today to help our neighbors recover from this ruinous storm? Our friends have lost their furniture, their medications, their appliances, their vehicles, their homes—even their jobs.

The needs on Ocracoke are particularly severe. On Ocracoke alone, more than 2,000 homes were damaged by the storm, including 50 that were destroyed, and another 100 that sustained devastating damage. A full 40% of Ocracoke residents have been displaced by Dorian. Even worse, many folks are without income, because so many businesses were damaged and closed.

We can help our neighbors rebuild. And so many have helped already. More than 4,600 families and businesses have contributed so far. From lemonade stands to corporate donations to individual gifts, our community has been so generous—yet the needs are still more immense.

How does it work? While the Outer Banks Community Foundation is collecting the financial gifts, our nonprofit partners are on the ground, supporting storm victims, reviewing applications for assistance, and distributing funds.

Disaster Relief Funds are being used for a variety of needs. We are helping storm victims with temporary shelter, home repairs, supplies, furniture, appliances, food, and other necessities. For those who are unemployed now because of the storm, our funds will be used even more broadly—for rent, for example, groceries, medical bills, and other expenses.

In short, the Disaster Relief Fund will rebuild our Outer Banks. With your help.

It’s time for neighbors to help neighbors. If you have given already to the Disaster Relief Fund, thank you so much for your gift. But if you have not yet contributed, we urge you to donate now to help our neighbors recover from this ruinous storm.

Thank you so much for your generosity.

 

Questions? Want more info? Check out our Dorian FAQ Page.

Community Foundation Helps Nonprofits with Disaster Recovery

The Outer Banks Community Foundation has awarded over $70,000 in Rapid Response Grants to nonprofits that are leading disaster relief efforts in the face of Hurricane Dorian, and to nonprofits that were devastated by the storm.

The Community Foundation has been busily raising money to help families and individuals from Ocracoke and Dare County recover from the storm. However, the funding for the Rapid Response Grants is from the Community Foundation’s own endowment, and is in addition to—and separate from—the new money raised for Ocracoke and Hatteras residents.

“Our primary focus has been raising funds to assist residents that were incapacitated by Dorian,” said Lorelei Costa, Executive Director of the Community Foundation, “but with the Rapid Response Grants, we are also recognizing that many of our local nonprofits were just as hard hit.”

“As soon as the storm winds died, nonprofits and volunteers were on the ground, in the receding waters, assisting storm victims—feeding people, mucking houses, clearing debris, providing supplies,” said Ms. Costa. “Some of our nonprofits did this with no funding, or they depleted their hard-won reserves, in order to provide emergency services to their neighbors.”

Among the recipients of the Rapid Response Grants were Hatteras Island Community Emergency Response Team, Ocracoke Fire Prevention Association, Interfaith Community Outreach, and Cape Hatteras United Methodist Men. All four nonprofits received grants for supplies, equipment, and tools to aid in their disaster recovery efforts.

The Beach Food Pantry, which has been supplying fresh fruits and vegetables to Ocracoke, received support, along with Hatteras Island Meals, the Food Bank of the Albemarle, and the Elizabeth City Corps of the Salvation Army, which has been providing hot meals to storm victims and first responders.

Other local nonprofits lost key infrastructure to the storm, or sustained overwhelming damage to their facilities. In Ocracoke, the community fish house, owned and operated by the nonprofit Ocracoke Working Watermen’s Association, was flooded and its ice house and retail space destroyed. OWWA received an $8,000 Rapid Response Grant to repair its ice house in time for the fall southern flounder fishery, which is economically important to local fishermen.

“The Ocracoke Food Pantry, the Ocracoke Community Park, Deepwater Theater, the Ocracoke Library—all operated by nonprofits, all sustained debilitating storm damage,” said Ms. Costa. “These organizations all received Rapid Response Grants to repair facilities and/or replace damaged equipment.”

Even on Roanoke Island, the Elizabethan Gardens lost a greenhouse, fencing, electrical systems, and numerous trees and plantings. An anonymous donor-advised fund at the Community Foundation will be assisting the Gardens with their rebuild.

The Rapid Response Grants were supported by the Community Foundation’s largest and broadest grant-making pool, the Community Fund, as well as numerous donor-advised and designated funds at the Community Foundation, including the Cathi Ostrander Family Fund, the Charles H. & Dorothy S. Luedemann Arts Fund, the Hatteras Fund, the Kelly Family Fund, the Preston Family Fund, the Shirley & David Doran Memorial Fund, the Simpson Sharp Oakes Fund, and the Spencer Family Fund.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation continues to collect financial contributions to assist individuals and families in Dare County and Ocracoke who have been devastated by Hurricane Dorian. All contributions are tax-deductible, and every penny of every gift will be used to directly assist local individuals and families. Donations can be made securely online at www.obxdisaster.org.

OBCF Disaster Fund Receives $50,000 from BB&T Charitable Fund

The Outer Banks Community Foundation’s Disaster Relief Fund has received a $50,000 grant from the BB&T Charitable Fund to help support hundreds of affected families across Dare County and Ocracoke following Hurricane Dorian.

“BB&T’s mission for our bank has always been to make our world a better place to live, and we are so honored to have this opportunity to help the members of our community and to provide support to the families in need,” said Annalisa Morgan, Albemarle Area Market President of BB&T.

BB&T’s leadership gift to the Disaster Relief Fund will make a direct impact on the victims of Hurricane Dorian in both Ocracoke and Dare County. The Disaster Relief Fund will help individuals and families with both immediate necessities—including supplies, appliances, temporary shelter—and also long-term recovery, including home repairs.

As the official collection agency for monetary donations post-Dorian, the Community Foundation is soliciting and processing all financial contributions, and then funneling every dollar to the nonprofits on the ground to aid disaster victims. The agencies distributing funds to victims include the Ocracoke Fire Protection Association, Cape Hatteras United Methodist Men, and Interfaith Community Outreach.

The groups work directly with disaster victims to first help them apply for any applicable sources of support, such as insurance and FEMA (if available). Then the Disaster Relief Fund, including the BB&T donation, will serve as “last dollars in” to meet any unmet needs, ensuring that philanthropic dollars go as far as possible.

The Disaster Relief Fund has grown to over $875,000 with contributions from more than 4,200 families from across the Outer Banks—and from across the United States and the world.

Yet, says Lorelei Costa, Executive Director of the Community Foundation, even this large amount is merely a “drop in the bucket” compared to community need, especially on Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands.

“So many of our neighbors have lost everything in this storm,” said Ms. Costa. “They lost not only their belongings, their medications, their cars, their homes; many have lost their jobs and source of income for months to come, as local businesses rebuild and recover from epic flood levels. The Disaster Relief Fund is in it for the long haul and will help local residents with all of these needs.”

“We are so very grateful to BB&T for this leadership gift,” said Greg Honeycutt, Ocracoke resident and board member of the Community Foundation. “They are truly setting the example for our business community. I hope more businesses will continue to pitch in.”

Ms. Costa emphasized that every penny donated to the Disaster Relief Fund will go to local individuals and families in need. Neither the Community Foundation, nor any of its nonprofit partners, are using disaster relief donations for fees, salaries, or administrative or operating expenses.

The Community Foundation is gratefully accepting donations to the Disaster Relief Fund for Dare and Ocracoke. Please go to www.obxdisaster.org to make a secure donation online, or mail your check to OBCF, 13 Skyline Road, Southern Shores, NC 27949, with “disaster relief” written in the memo line. Or call 252-261-8839 for more information on how to give.

OBCF Announces Rapid-Response Grants Cycle for Nonprofits after Dorian

The Outer Banks Community Foundation has announced an emergency, rapid-response grants cycle to support nonprofit organizations after Hurricane Dorian. Applications are due by Friday, September 20. To apply, call Lorelei Costa at 252-455-1404.

 

Grant Purpose

First Priority: The primary goal of these grants is to enable nonprofits to provide immediate disaster relief and short-term recovery support to residents of Dare County and Ocracoke.

Second Priority: If funds are available, grants will be considered to help nonprofits in Dare County or Ocracoke repair or replace any facilities, equipment, buildings, or other assets that were lost or damaged due to Hurricane Dorian, if the nonprofit demonstrates that funds are needed immediately.

 

Eligible Organizations

Nonprofit organizations serving Ocracoke and/or Dare County with 501(c)3 public charity status may apply—including those organizations that already have an active grant with the Community Foundation. Local organizations may be given priority for funding.

Schools, government agencies, and individuals are not eligible to apply.

Churches and faith-based organizations are eligible to apply if they are assisting the wider community (i.e., not just members of their own faith or congregation), and if their outreach does not include the promotion of religious beliefs. Grantees must provide services on a nondiscriminatory basis.

 

Eligible Projects and Grant Expenses

First Priority: Hurricane Dorian Relief Grants are intended to help nonprofits provide immediate and short-term assistance to residents of Dare County and Ocracoke who have been affected by Hurricane Dorian. Grants can pay for food, supplies, equipment, educational materials, and other tangible goods and direct expenses. Operating, overhead, and indirect costs are not eligible for grant funding.

Special emphasis may be given to efforts that help the most vulnerable and/or the most people.

Contract help and/or additional program staff may also be eligible if used for extra personnel that was hired or augmented to meet the need after Dorian. Grants are to be used for program staff only; neither administrative nor management staff time is eligible.

Rapid response grants are not intended to be used by a nonprofit to provide direct financial assistance to hurricane victims. Financial assistance to individuals should be covered through the Community Foundation’s Disaster Relief Funds, in cooperation with our existing nonprofit partners. Please call our staff if you have questions about these parameters.

Second Priority: If funds are available, grants may be considered to help nonprofits in repairing or replacing any facilities, equipment, buildings, or other assets in Dare County or Ocracoke that were lost or damaged due to Hurricane Dorian. This includes all nonprofits in the affected area, not just relief-related nonprofits. For eligibility within this rapid-response grant cycle, a nonprofit should demonstrate that funds are needed immediately. For non-immediate needs, nonprofits may be encouraged to apply in 2020 when additional funds are available.

Repair of public infrastructure or facilities is not eligible for funding (e.g., road or school repair).

All grants will be paid on a reimbursement basis. Grant expenses must be substantiated by third-party documentation (e.g., receipts, statements, and invoices). These documents should be generated from your vendor, not from your organization, with the exception of documentation of staff time. Grants for staff time will be paid upon the furnishing of timesheets; please ask our staff for sample timesheets or if you have questions.

Any expenses incurred during, after, and even immediately before Dorian are eligible within this grant program.

 

How To Apply

Before applying, please call or email Lorelei Costa (252-455-1404 or LCosta@obcf.org) to discuss your nonprofit’s needs.

Applications should consist of a one- or two-page letter, briefly describing the mission of your nonprofit, your project, the need you are meeting, and who will benefit from your services. Please be as specific as possible in terms of the number and demographics of the people you serve.

Attached to your letter, please include a project budget and, if you’ve never received a grant from the Community Foundation, your 501(c)3  letter.

Email your letter on or before Friday, September 20 to LCosta@obcf.org.

Grants will be announced on Friday, September 27.